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Welcome to Travel Writers' Tales, an independent travel article syndicate that offers affordable and professionally written travel articles to newspaper editors and publishers. Over the course of a 52 week term, we will meet your need for travel copy, whether it is one story a week, bi-weekly or monthly. We provide two CD ROMs, each covering your six month supply. The lively and up-to-date travel stories are written by accredited travel writers. As well as diversified destinations, the compilation of articles is thematically selected to suit the calendar year. The pre-packaged CD ROMs not only simplify publishing deadlines, but also promote increased advertising sales on a monthly basis. Travel Writers' Tales offers the discerning armchair traveler, as well as the active adventure seeker, glimpses into the excitement and mystery of worlds that lie beyond our horizons.

If we are always arriving and departing, it is also true that we are eternally anchored. One's destination is never a place but rather a new way of looking at things.
....Henry Miller (1891–1980)

October 2017
DOWN UNDER IN KURANDA
Riding the Rails on Land and Sky

by Margaret Deefholts

I’m fanning myself with a newspaper while sitting on a platform bench at Freshwater Station, a small railway junction, a short distance away from Cairns in Queensland. The 35-degree temperature and humidity isn’t relieved by a breeze, and the adjoining restaurant behind me is doing a roaring business in ice-cream and iced lemonade sales. Like the crowds of Japanese tourists milling around the station, I’m eager to board the small train which will chug me uphill through the Barron River Valley to the little town of Kuranda. ... read more »


HAUNTED D’ARCY ISLAND
by Cherie Thiessen

Can an island be hostile? We’re beginning to think so. “What is it about this place?” My partner, David, asks me uneasily as we struggle through the shadowy, claustrophobic tangle of torn limbs and dead trees, trying not to trip over the vines underfoot. ... read more »


IXTAPA-ZIHUATANEJO – TWO DESTINATIONS IN ONE
by Ray Chatelin

Midway down the west coast of Mexico are two destinations you can visit for the price of one. In fact, the only extra charge you can expect is an 11-peso bus fare.

For while Ixtapa and Zihuatanejo are marketed as a single destination, each has its own character, history and culture and each place appeals to a distinctly different vacation personality. ... read more »


CAPTIVATING ARMENIA
by Irene Butler

Republic Square has a beauty that touches one’s soul. The hues of serene pink to soft orange of 19th century edifices in locally-mined stone called “tuff” take on a different persona with the rising sun, in mid-day’s bold light, and during evening shadows. This square is Rick’s and my spectacular debut to Yerevan, the capital, which rests in a valley with the Hrazdan River winding through it. ... read more »


September 2017
BREATHTAKING BAKER
by Jane Cassie

In our opinion, September is the best month for hiking. It's often sunny, usually bug-free and not as busy, especially mid-week when the kids are back in school. From our White Rock deck, Mount Baker juts up like a frosted pinnacle and prompts us to dust off our packs, poles and boots. Although not the highest Cascade peak, it’s definitely the iciest. No doubt, that’s why the Lummi Indians coined it Koma Kulshan, meaning, “The Great White Watcher.” ... read more »


TAKING ENGLAND LITERALLY
by Margaret Deefholts

It is a modest little brick cottage by the side of the road—one which I could have easily missed were I not specifically looking for it. Yet, this home in Chalfont St. Giles, Buckinghamshire, was where one of England’s greatest poets and writers, John Milton, once lived and worked. ... read more »


IN AWE OF ORCAS
by Karoline Cullen Photos by Karoline & Gary Cullen

It’s a quiet summer morning on Galiano Island and I am comfortably ensconced on a deck chair. Song birds flit back and forth between their feeder and the bird bath. A deer slowly munches its way along the hillside, passing through sunbeams filtered by Garry oaks and arbutus trees. I relish the calm as I sip my tea and scan the waters of Active Pass with binoculars. It looks empty but then I look again. ... read more »


BOSTON – AMERICA’S HISTORICAL HEARTLAND
by Ray Chatelin

BOSTON, MA - This city is all about history – American history. And all you must do to enjoy it is to follow the red line painted along the brick sidewalks. ... read more »


August 2017
SCOOTIN'THE SCENIC SAN JUANS
by Jane Cassie

The continuous archipelago of the San Juan Islands extends along the ocean’s bed from the southeast tip of Vancouver Island to the northern part of Fidalgo Island. Orcas Island claims centre stage and is our first of two stops during this weekend escape. ... read more »


CANADA’S UNCLE TOM’S CABIN
by Margaret Deefholts

The log cabin is crouched against the wind, its weathered timbers blurred by snow flurries. Along with a group of visitors, I try to imagine the man who once lived within its walls. His name was Josiah Henson and although his abode is located on “Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site” in Dresden, Ontario, the reference to Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin is a symbolic rather than factual. The fictional Uncle Tom never lived in Canada, and his cabin would have been located on a plantation in Kentucky. ... read more »


NATURE, ADVENTURE CLOSE UP IN COSTA RICA
by Lauren Kramer

This travel story comes with a caution: if you’re visiting Costa Rica for any reason other than its nature, don’t bother. Don’t come for the food, which is easily forgettable. The most popular dishes are gallo pinto, which is rice-and-beans, and fried pork skins known as chicharrones. While local Costa Ricans love this food, if you’re not from here you might well be mystified by its appeal. Don’t come for the driving conditions either, as the winding back roads leading to the coastlines and volcanic regions inland can be perilous, with bathtub sized potholes and no streetlights out of the city. ... read more »


ECO TOURISM IS HUATULCO’S WINNING INGREDIENT
by Chris McBeath

The van bumped and cajoled its way up into the Sierra Madre del Sur mountains, kicking pebbles into the jungle precipice from the dirt track and lurching to a standstill every so often for us to view the local wildlife: a tarantula the size of Boris Karloff’s hand, an armadillo waddling out of our way, and a rattler warming its length in the Mexican sun. ... read more »


TIRELESS TAIPEI, TAIWAN
by Irene Butler

Taipei is like a jumbo box of Crayola’s with every colour of sign competing for attention along the capital’s shop-filled streets of Zhongzheng District. Voluminous crowds and mega traffic round out the stimulating atmosphere. We love it! ... read more »


July 2017
GOING UNDERGROUND AT KARTCHNER CAVERNS
by Jane Cassie

When my husband suggests that we go underground and check out some caves in Arizona, I respond with a big, "Really?!" He knows that I'm not a fan of dark, enclosed spaces, let alone bats that love to hang out in this subterranean environment. "Have no fear," he says, as if reading my mind. "There's no need for spelunking gear at Kartchner Caverns." ... read more »


A DAY IN THE LIFE OF MUMBAI
by Margaret Deefholts

I am standing near a massive archway, appropriately called the “Gateway of India” where the Arabian Sea swells against the shores of India’s most powerful and dynamic city – Mumbai. The rise and fall of voices, the cries of vendors, the persistent beeping of car horns, the rush and roar of traffic are the sounds of a city that throbs to the heartbeat of twenty million people who call it home. ... read more »


THE ISLAND OF DOMINICA IS A CARIBBEAN SECRET
Story and Photography by Jamie Ross

Oh dream of dreams: here I am swimming through a sea of champagne, bubbles boiling all around me and rising gently to the ocean surface. I almost want to take the snorkel out of month and lap up the sparkling liquid – but I won’t of course, because sensibly I know that drinking and diving don’t mix. Besides, the gross salty seawater might spoil this dream that has me frolicking around in a goblet of booze. ... read more »


HARRISON HOT SPRINGS, BC
Going Natural in the Fraser Valley

by Chris Millikan

Just outside town, a sculpted wooden Sasquatch welcomes visitors to Harrison Hot Springs. Like us, many stop for photos with this legendary being. As well, similar sculptures pose in other village spots. Giant footprints decorate pavement tiles linking hotels, public pool, restaurants or shops selling ‘Bigfoot’ chocolates. ... read more »


June 2017
NEW ZEALAND – More Than a Walk Through Middle Earth
by Ray Chatelin

It’s very likely that Mother Nature used New Zealand as a test model before going on to the rest of the world, just to make sure her ideas worked. For as you tour the country, it becomes clear that the two islands that make up the country have every imaginable climate and topography, much of which can be defined by your nose. ... read more »


GETTING WET ON A MEXICAN RANCH
by John Geary

Splash!
I was in the water, and hanging on for dear life – or at least to prevent any embarrassment. And I was once again, swimming with an animal. ... read more »


COMOX VALLEY LULLABY
by Lauren Kramer

Victoria, Tofino, Parksville. If there are spotlight stealers on Vancouver Island, it’s this trio that garners all the attention. For road warriors who love to venture off the beaten track, this bodes well for the Comox Valley. On a summery weekend visit to Courtenay, Comox and Cumberland, we learned this verdant coastal region is an undiscovered treasure chest brimming with fun activities. Rich in history, what you see is what you get in the Comox Valley – and what meets the eye is unforgettable natural beauty, charming downtown cores, an emphasis on local, home grown cuisine and soft adventures through which you can taste, feel and touch the island’s bounty. ... read more »


BLISS AT BIG STICK
by Jane Cassie

A morning mist permeates the evergreen shoreline and cloaks the lake with a mystical veil. A boater slices through it silently. His reel is set, line is cast and he sits, waiting with patience. Shards of sunlight pierce the vapor and reflect off a nearby kayaker as she languidly paddles by. And at the adjacent river mouth a doe takes time to graze. ... read more »


May 2017
QUESTIONING CANADA
by Colleen Friesen

It was a quest.
We would drive across Canada and find somewhere new to live.
We’d been across the country before but this time was different. We rented out our Vancouver apartment for a year, put our severely-edited remaining things into storage and stuffed the rest into the teeny drawers of our new turtle-shell; a 17 1/2' RPod trailer. ... read more »


ON TOP OF THE WORLD AT CATHEDRAL LAKES PARK
by Jane Cassie

Thirty kilometers from Keremeos and two thousand meters skyward, awaits Cathedral Provincial Park and some of the most heavenly hiking that you’ll find in BC. The 33,000-hectare (80,000-acre) mountain wilderness is splashed with azure lakes, cloaked with alpine meadows, and backed by some mighty majestic peaks. ... read more »


LEICESTER’S ELUSIVE CELEBRITY
Who was Richard III?

by Margaret Deefholts

Was he or wasn’t he a monster? That is the question!
According to Shakespeare, he was a cruel despot and a cold blooded murderer. But as some historians would have it, Richard III was badly maligned – he was nowhere near the psychopathic character portrayed by Shakespeare, whose play of the same name has its share of historical inaccuracies. But who cares...Richard as an anti-hero makes for splendid theatre, and riveting drama! And so the deformed man who bewailed “the winter of my discontent” as he hobbled hunch-backed onto the stage, remains lodged in our minds. ... read more »


THE SILENT SENTINALS OF SGANG HWAAY
by Karoline Cullen

They are silent sentinels standing above the shoreline. Leaning, crumbling and decaying poles, carved more than 100 years ago. Blank eyes still stare out to sea and their symbolism reaches across the ages in a mystical way. ... read more »


April 2017
RV-ING WITH OUR CANINE COMPANION
by Jane Cassie

When our suitcases come out of the closet, our Schnauzer, Kalli, goes into panic mode. She neurotically shakes, scurries and gives us the occasional whimper. There's no need for conversation. Her pleading brown eyes clearly relay her thoughts: "Do I get to come along or are you leaving me behind?" As we transfer our travelling possessions from the house to RV, she has the answer. And she's the first one in the driver's seat. ... read more »


NAMBIA'S SHIFTING SANDS
by Chris McBeath

Namibia has many names. The bushman call it The Land God Made in Anger. Seafaring Portuguese named its coastline the Gates of Hell, likely for the hundreds of shipwrecks still wallowing in the shallow waters. And others speak of A Thirstland Wilderness. Intriguing, harsh, and beautiful, Namibia is all these things. ... read more »


CYCLING THE LOIRE VALLEY
Chateau de Villandry

by Chris Millikan

Our dream of a self-guided Loire Valley bike trip finally becomes a reality.
To simplify planning, Macs Adventure develops our ‘Chateaux and Gardens’ itinerary. With input from us, family-run lodgings, breakfasts, dinners, rental bicycles, helmets, maps and luggage transfers are all arranged. And we’re off! ... read more »


ST THOMAS – WITHOUT A DOUBT
by Margaret Deefholts

I am standing in a cramped, musty cave. The gloom is pierced by a shaft of sunlight filtering through a narrow aperture at one end of the cave, and the ray rests on what looks like a large rough handprint on the rock floor. ... read more »


March 2017
LEONARDO DA VINCI'S AMBOISE
France’s Renaissance Capital

by Rick Millikan

Site of France’s early royal court…and Leonardo da Vinci’s last home, Amboise inspires wondrous investigations. Strolling across the main bridge into old town, a cobblestone street leads us past bistros, patisseries, 15th century clock tower and antique shops. Winding up a hillside, we admire half-timbered homes and marvel at cave dwellings carved into chalky-white cliffs, common in the Loire Valley. ... read more »


IMPRESSIONS OF IRELAND
by Margaret Deefholts

Ireland, on this my first visit, is a mélange of impressions. For starters, looking out of my plane window as we circle the countryside on our approach to Dublin, I can’t but think how appropriate the description “The Emerald Isle” is even though it borders on cliché. Below me are fields flung like green counterpanes over the land, bottle-green hedgerows that frame thread-like lanes, olive-green groves of trees which border clusters of town houses, and lustrous green-leafed deciduous trees shading the lawns of stately county estates. ... read more »


SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO – A Walk in The Past
by Ray Chatelin

You can’t escape the past in Santa Fe. It clings to you at every corner, stares at you from every doorway and window, and speaks to you from the ancient cliff dwellings in the nearby hills. Here you’ll find a physical and spiritual combination of an aboriginal culture, an imported European past and chic 21st Century Americana. ... read more »


RIVER CRUISING THE CANADIAN WAY
Boating Ontario’s Trent-Severn Waterway

by Jamie Ross

I have always been excited by the mysteries of river travel. Voyaging aboard a large cruise ship across the ocean has never held must fascination for me, but a slow boat down a meandering, well-travelled waterway stokes my imagination. After reading Mark Twain, what spirited youngster has not dreamt of being Huck Finn, drifting down a river’s wide expanse, the changing scenery, passing vessels, the bustle of activity and the characters you meet lead to new adventures and fresh discoveries around every bend? ... read more »


A Vista Villa Couples Retreat
A Hidden Oasis!

by Jane Cassie

What determines a great romantic getaway? Spectacular views? Luxurious accommodations? How about all of these and more? Well, that's what we discover at this unique sanctuary in the heart of BC’s sunny Okanagan. ... read more »


February 2017
PURE ESCAPISM
AT ARIZONA INN

by Jane Cassie

It's late Thursday afternoon and the gray ribbon of highway before us is cloaked with bumper to bumper gridlock. We inch along in our little red rental, butting up to suburbia vans, luxury Lincolns, and rust-bucket half tons, all who have the same purpose in mind. To get where they're going, and as quickly as possible. Although we're quite familiar with rush hour in our own bustling metropolis, the surrounding vista reminds us that we're not at home. ... read more »


72 HOURS IN & AROUND QUITO
by Lauren Kramer

When it comes to exploring Quito, Ecuador's capital, you have to venture into the cobbled side streets of the city's Old Town to learn what makes the area distinct and different. In the shadows of buildings centuries old, sample street food and breathe the air of ancient churches. Then head north on the Pan American highway to glimpse real life in Ecuador: country roads, small town squares and roasted pork sold one slice at a time by the side of the road. Here's our top choices for three days in and around Ecuador's capital. ... read more »


GENIAL GEORGIA – TBILISI AND COUNTRYSIDE
by Irene Butler

"First we eat...and then we do everything else." This restaurant billboard has my husband, Rick, chuckling, "Hey, my motto!" And this order of things is good advice with Georgia's delectable traditional cuisine. We especially can't get enough khinkali; twisted knobs of steamed dough stuffed with meat or cheese or mushrooms! ... read more »


KUCHING: MALAYSIA'S CAPTIVATING ‘CAT' CITY
by Margaret Deefholts

A woman in a blazing orange and green batik-print gown and embroidered head scarf examines pair of sunglasses bearing a designer label; a stout matriarch, floppy hat perched on her head, presides over her display of fresh bok choy and taro roots; a shop-keeper rolls out a bolt of shimmering brocade for a couple of teenagers, and two little girls giggle shyly as I stop to take a look at the array of fresh fish set out on green plastic trays. ... read more »


January 2017
COSTA RICA'S QUIRKY GEMS
by Chris McBeath

Most people come to Costa Rica for its tropical climes, secluded beaches, and endless eco adventures. For those who think they know the landscapes, or prefer a less trodden path, here are some gems to discover. ... read more »


THE SECRET WORLD OF THE MAYA AT EDZNA
by Margaret Deefholts

Mention the word "Yucatan" and friends immediately exclaim, "Wasn't Chichen Itza awesome?" I have to confess that I didn't visit it. Puzzled frowns: "You didn't?" "No," I say apologetically, then add brightly, "but I did see the Mayan ruins at Edzna." Nobody has heard of them, so eyes cloud over and the subject gets changed. ... read more »


PALM SPRINGS – More than Shopping and Golf
by Ray Chatelin

Travelers heading south for a week or more, are generally there for one reason - to escape the rain, snow and cold that grips our part of the world between November and March. ... read more »


FEASTING ON THE JUNGLE'S BOUNTY
by Hans Tammemagi

"Go ahead, touch it," says Ericson, our guide, holding out a seven-foot-long rainbow boa constrictor that is squirming and wrapping itself around his arms. I inch forward and nervously slide my hand along the iridescent skin. Surprisingly, the snake feels smooth and, well, almost pleasant. Nevertheless, I quickly step back. ... read more »


SNOOPING AROUND AGATHA CHRISTIE'S RIVIERA
by Jamie Ross

"No seaside town in the south of England is, I think, as attractive as St. Loo – which reminds one forcibly of the Riviera."

Such is the opening line of Agatha Christie's ‘Peril at End House.' The thoughts are from Hercule Poirot's associate, Captain Hastings, the city of St. Loo is actually Torquay in South Devon, and the famous detective and his friend are sitting on the terrace of the Hotel Majestic, high on a headland, overlooking the sea. My wife and I sit on the terrace of the Imperial Hotel taking in the same magnificent coastal view, whilst enjoying a Devon cream tea, an afternoon ritual which includes a rather surprising delicious pastry, a mixture of jam and clotted cream on a tasty scone. The Majestic and Imperial are actually the same place, and today I am the marvellous detective and my spouse the somewhat blundering side-kick, at least in my own mind. ... read more »


December 2016
TRAIPSING TERENGGANU
by Jane Cassie

Where the heck is Kuala Terengganu? Although it took me only a few hours to get my bearings in this quintessentially Malaysian fishing town, I still have yet to say it correctly. With or without the proper pronunciation, it's well worth the visit. ... read more »


OFF THE TOURIST TRAIL IN CAMPECHE
Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula

by Margaret Deefholts

I'm sitting with friends at an open-air restaurant, sipping coffee and listening to people chatting in Spanish at neighbouring tables. Pots of bright yellow marigolds, heads nodding in the breeze, fringe the patio, and the slant of sun across the stone flagged courtyard lends a sense of leisure, warmth, lassitude. It is my first day in Campeche, Mexico and I'm savouring the unhurried hours. ... read more »


CHRISTMAS WITH THE PENGUINS IN ANTARCTICA
by Irene Butler

A welcoming committee of penguins meet us at the shoreline dressed in their finest tuxes! Gentoo penguins flaunt showy orange beaks, while the Chinstrap proudly sport narrow strips of black feathers around their chins. ... read more »


A TROPICAL CHRISTMAS WITH MUSICAL PASSION
by Hans Tammemagi

Escaping from the traditional Canadian Christmas with family, my wife, Ally, and I stepped off the plane into the hot tropical climate of Rarotonga in the Cook Islands. We were deep in the middle of the Pacific Ocean on a classic circular atoll dominated by a verdant mountain in the middle and surrounded by a glorious coral reef. ... read more »


November 2016
BARCELONA – SPAIN'S CULTURAL HEART
by Ray Chatelin

Lying on the Mediterranean Sea near the north end of the Costa Brava, Barcelona is more than Spain's second largest city of Spain, its largest port, and its chief commercial and industrial center. ... read more »


DANCING WITH WOLVES
"INTERACT WITH A WOLF PACK AT QUEBEC'S PARK MAHIKA!"

by Jamie Ross

I stagger sleepily from my cosy bed inside the Mongolian yurt, open the airtight stove, and stir up the glowing embers inside. I add some wood shavings, kindling and logs, while blowing gently on the coals, gradually coaxing the fire back to life. It is minus 30 outside tonight, but if I keep the flames going it stays pleasant within the ornate shelter. ... read more »


A FISHPOND PADDLE
by Karoline Cullen

"Huli!" The command to switch sides is quickly followed by "Imua, imua!" "Go, go!" I change my paddle from left to right, thankfully not dropping it in the process, and lean into a furious stroke. The call "Hoe h?pi!" or "Paddles up!" brings welcome relief to burning shoulder muscles. The outrigger catches the crest of the wave, speeds up, and we're rapidly surfing towards the shore. ... read more »


October 2016
THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL – AN ENDLESS ADVENTURE
by Chris McBeath

Anyone who has read Bill Bryson's A Walk in the Woods will have a certain appreciation for the Appalachian Trail and the Blue Ridge Mountains in Georgia. Yet for all his humour, descriptions of his torturous hike never talked about the almost mystical beauty of the region where in spring, wild rhododendrons wash the forest floor with a soft pink and honeysuckles scent the fresh, mountain air. ... read more »


LONDON'S FAVOURITE HAUNTS
by Jane Cassie

He's dressed from head to toe in raven black and melds seamlessly into the pitch dark night. In one hand is an umbrella that doubles as a cane. In the other, is a flashlight, waiting to come to life. Timing is everything, and when the nearby bell of St Andrews begins to toll, he goes into action. ... read more »


MOROCCO: LAND OF MEDINAS, MINARETS AND MYSTERY
by Margaret Deefholts

Morocco conjures up images of medinas, minarets – and mystery. A land of exotic perfumes, plaintive music, intrigue and romance à la Bogart and Bergman. Casablanca, the first place on my itinerary isn't any of the above. It is a large commercial metropolis, bland as any other international hub. Traffic flows along broad boulevards and the sidewalks are busy with business-suited executives, camera toting tourists and women in flowing caftans. Nothing special. ... read more »


SAN JUAN ISLAND OFFERS A WHALE OF A TIME
by Lauren Kramer

There's an aura of mysterious, wild beauty that lingers in the San Juans, where close to 90% of the archipelago's 172 isles remain untouched and unsettled. Kayak or boat to their shores and all you'll find around you is raptors, the silvery heads of harbor seals and a few deer who braved the currents to get there. ... read more »


CHASING BOND IN THE SWISS ALPS
by Jamie Ross

I don't know about you, but whenever I'm doing something active and exciting, I hear the James Bond musical score playing in my head. Such is the case today, as I am driving the narrow, winding switchbacks and cliff hugging roads in Switzerland. I suddenly imagine that my rental car is an Aston Martin. I push the pedal down and make squealing tire noises with my mouth as we swerve around the tight curves. My wife, who is accompanying me, begins to feel shaken, not stirred, and the Bond theme is replaced by a certain ringing in my ears. But you know the secret agent drill – sharply dressed, daring mission, chic travelling companion (in this case my angry wife). ... read more »


September 2016
NEW YORK CITY – NAVIGATING THE WORLD
by Ray Chatelin

New York - The first thing you have to understand about this city is that it is more than just another place to visit. New York is a world onto itself where the real and the illusory combine in one place and where you have to diminish its size before you can successfully navigate its charms. ... read more »


WORLD HERITAGE POTSDAM
Parks, Palaces and the Cold War

by Chris Millikan

Our exceptional holiday along the elegant Elbe River brims with discoveries. One Viking Cruise excursion introduces Potsdam's intriguing past, beginning with Cold War history at the legendary Glienicke Bridge. ... read more »


HOME ON THE RANGE AT SIWASH LAKE
by Jane Cassie

His cocoa brown eyes appear despondent, yet when glancing my way he blinks flirtatiously. He inches closer, gently nudging my side. There's an instant connection. "What's with the long face, Dude?" I ask, while brushing a wisp of silver hair away from his freckled brow. Although he doesn't reply, I know how to make him happy. And before long, I have him eating out of the palm of my hand.
. ... read more »


GOING WILD IN THE VALLEY
by Cherie Thiessen

The lush and fertile farmlands of Vancouver Island's Cowichan Valley are not surprisingly the home of the popular "Slow Food" movement, a trend that stresses from farm to table and from foraging to feasting. My partner, David, and I jumped on the B.C. Ferries and headed over to tunnel into the beating heart of this movement, deep in the valley's hidden foodie oases. ... read more »


August 2016
CHECKING OUT THE CHIEF
by Jane Cassie

The Sea to Sky Highway has always been one of my favourite drives. Whenever we head up Whistler way, I love to check out the sites: the seascape and inky-blue backdrop of Howe Sound, BC's Mining Museum and historic township of Britannia Beach, and the coloured spots that inch their way up The Stawamus Chief. At least that's what they look like from the base of this sheer granite slab that soars 610 meters (2,000 feet) skyward, just outside the city of Squamish. With my face pressed against the window and head cranked mountain-side, I strain to catch a glimpse of the rock-hugging daredevils as we whiz on by. Like gravity-defying ants, they scale the vertical rise, a challenge conquerable only by the boldest and buffest. ... read more »


HAWAII'S LEGENDARY VOLCANOES
VISITING GODDESS PELE'S HOME

by Rick Millikan

With fellow nature lovers, we head off to learn about Hawaii's volcanoes and witness Kilauea's fiery caldera at twilight. Investigations begin in north Kona, where Ka'ahumanu highway slices through vast lava flows. ... read more »


CALCUTTA THEN, KOLKATA NOW

by Margaret Deefholts

I am doing a risky thing. I am revisiting Calcutta (Kolkata as it's now called) - a city where I was once a little girl living with my parents and my sister in the long vanished world of Raj. So now, after all these years, will my childhood memories of the city I loved be shattered? If I'm to believe ex-Calcuttans who have returned on visits, the city is a sweltering hellhole of teeming crowds, beggars, crumbling tenements and overflowing garbage heaps. ... read more »


COIMBRA - THE PRIDE OF PORTUGAL
by Chris McBeath

When I think of robes and academia, the staff at Hogwarts comes to mind. Snapes billowing down ancient corridors, bats passing through mournful apparitions, and eclectic treasures appearing at every corner. Then I discovered Portugal's Coimbra University. ... read more »


TRYING TO GET A BITE IN ALGONQUIN PARK
by John Geary

Bzzz...slap! Bzzzz.....slap!
Humping along the trail with the paddles and fishing gear, I thought to myself, "I hope the fish are biting even as half as much these mosquitos!"
I was part of a small group of outdoor enthusiasts portaging canoes from Lake Opeongo to tiny Minnow Lake in Ontario's Algonquin Provincial Park. I was about to do something I'd never done before – if the mosquitos didn't eat me alive, that is. ... read more »


July 2016
BRITAIN IN THE SLOW LANE - BOATING ON THE NORFOLK BROADS
by Cherie Thiessen

My partner and skipper, David Dossor, loves munching kippers or a ploughman's lunch while sipping the ales on tap in Britain's historic old pubs.

Our friends, Gerry McKeating and Pat Crossley, are avid and expert birders who have come on this trip specifically for the best bird watching in the country. One quarter of the country's rare wild life and flora exist in the Broads, Britain's largest protected wetland. ... read more »


TUMBLING DOWN THE THOMPSON
by Jane Cassie

My husband, Brent, is one of those domestic guys. Without being nagged he'll do the vacuuming, cooking –even the laundry. So on this adventure, when we get agitated by the washboard spin, churned up in the garburator and spewed out of the roiling cauldron, he manages to keeps his cool. It's the Terminator that finally gets his vocal chords going. Not a surprise –he's a bit of a wuss when it comes to thrillers. ... read more »


PASSION FOR PORTLAND
by Colleen Friesen

Whether winemakers, lamp makers, distilled-spirit makers, tea blenders, sushi servers, Vermouth drinkers, beer brewers, sake makers, bicycle guides, or kayak paddlers, the theme remains the same, people in Portland are not just creating a product or service, but with the creativity and enthusiasm they bring to their livelihood, they are creating a passionate life. ... read more »


ON AND OFF THE RAILS IN SOUTH AFRICA
The Sholongololo Experience

by Margaret Deefholts

There is an enormous shudder, a loud clanking jolt...and wheee, we're off! I peer out of my window as the sign "Cape Town" on the railway platform slides away into my past. We are moving...new horizons beckon. ... read more »



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freelance travel writers Jane Cassie and Margaret Deefholts

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