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Welcome to Travel Writers' Tales, an independent travel article syndicate that offers affordable and professionally written travel articles to newspaper editors and publishers. Over the course of a 52 week term, we will meet your need for travel copy, whether it is one story a week, bi-weekly or monthly. We provide two CD ROMs, each covering your six month supply. The lively and up-to-date travel stories are written by accredited travel writers. As well as diversified destinations, the compilation of articles is thematically selected to suit the calendar year. The pre-packaged CD ROMs not only simplify publishing deadlines, but also promote increased advertising sales on a monthly basis. Travel Writers' Tales offers the discerning armchair traveler, as well as the active adventure seeker, glimpses into the excitement and mystery of worlds that lie beyond our horizons.

If we are always arriving and departing, it is also true that we are eternally anchored. One’s destination is never a place but rather a new way of looking at things.
....Henry Miller (1891–1980)

July 2014
VICTORIA ATTRACTIONS FOR BABIES & BOOMERS
by Jane Cassie

Ever since the birth of our grandson, Victoria has been a second home. Although our visits are usually confined to indoor cuddle time, during this trip we decide to take him to a few visitors' haunts. And while strapped into his snuggly, wee Keegan gets to be a tourist in his home town. read more »


A FAIR DINKUM HOLIDAY DOWN UNDER
The Road Less Travelled

by Margaret Deefholts

"Wow! Look at this! It's perfect!" My sister jabs at an advertisement in Australia's The Senior newspaper. The advert by Magic Murray Holidays sounds ideal: a 7-day trip by luxury coach around the Murray River basin in New South Wales and Victoria. Four star accommodation, most meals, and an expert tour guide-all for just $500. It's a deal! read more »


IN PERPETUITY AT PČRE LACHAISE
by Karoline Cullen

I hear a bell. Its persistent peal floats over the trees and echoes off the stones. "Does that ringing mean something?" I ask. My friend starts walking, saying over her shoulder "It's time to go. We don't want to get locked in!" read more »


PORTLAND: A BOOZY, BACCHANALIAN PARADISE
by Hans Tammemagi

Okay, it may be politically incorrect to say this, but I love a tipple, and my throat becomes positively parched whenever I think of Portland, Oregon, that bountiful, boozy burg. Accompanied by three like-minded friends, I recently paid a visit. Our mission was to explore the latest hot, alcohol-fueled trend: urban wineries. What a brilliant concept, I thought, as we made plans to sip pinot noirs and gris, sauvignon blancs and zinfandels without ever leaving city limits. With 14 wineries to choose from, we had work to do. read more »


June 2014
CASCADE CAMPING
by Jane Cassie

Camping, for some keeners, means cramming-in as many adrenaline-surging activities as possible. For me, it's all about roasting marshmallows over an open fire, lying back with a good book and connecting with Mother Nature. And during this three-day trip of Washington's Cascade Loop, I enjoy just that! read more »


TOUR DE LONG BEACH:
Cycling Across Vancouver Island

by Rick Millikan

The ferry-load of vehicles roars past and it's a quiet ride along the highway. Entering Nanaimo's Parkway Trail, we spin through riots of wildflowers and under shady evergreens. After stops to snack on wild blackberries, there's an invigorating swim in Colliery Dam's reservoir. Proceeding refreshed along this woodsy bikeway, a deer leaps from some brush ahead. A trailside pub above Brannen Lake rewards our initial jaunt. We bivouac at a local Eden-like campground. read more »


NATURE, HISTORY ABOUND ON GEORGIA'S SOUTH COAST
by John Geary

Something catches the corner of my eye on the left. I quickly turn my head, and see water ripple where something has just disappeared. Glancing in the direction the ripple seemed to be heading, I'm rewarded with another 'gator sighting as its head pops up, about 10 yards away. read more »


IN HOT WATER - A 6-PACK OF B.C. HOT SPRINGS
by Cherie Thiessen

While eagles overhead check the river for different delights, I'm in Nirvana, wrapped in the springs' soothing mineral waters. How can anything so pleasurable be good for you? Nevertheless, the Kootenay Rockies' hot springs are known for their therapeutic benefits. The mineral content of the waters are widely believed to increase metabolism, accelerate healing, soothe muscles, improve blood circulation and detoxify the body's lymphatic system, not to mention what they do for the soul. On Day 3 of our 8-day circular hot springs tour, my partner. David, and I are already humming. read more »


May 2014
CIRCLE THE WAGONS IN ALBERTA'S BADLANDS
by Chris McBeath

If you grew up in the 50s and 60s, TV shows like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, Rawhide and other spaghetti Westerns were the stuff of Saturday afternoons. "Circle the wagons" was the battle cry and the Lone Ranger - "hiyo Silver!" - was our masked crusader. Today, reruns of these noirs favourites have become so au courant they are driving demand to relive the Wild West as it once was, albeit with a modern twist. read more »


OFF THE BEATEN TRACK IN THE UK:
THE COTSWOLD CAPER

by Chris Millikan

Our Cotswold walking holiday begins in little known Monkton Combe, eight-kilometers from Bath. Settled at the village inn, we examine pre-booked custom itinerary, maps, trail-cards and even transportation vouchers, everything needed for our self-guided explorations. And shouldering daypacks filled with directions, hats, jackets, water, sunscreen and snacks, we take our first walk. read more »


BORNEO'S SHY "DUTCHMAN"
by Margaret Deefholts

The dug-out canoe wobbles, and I instinctively grab onto the sides. Then the outboard motor catches and settles to a low purr and the canoe steadies as it moves forward through the thick, muddy waters of the Kinabatangan river. read more »


MAKING MEMORIES IN MAUI
Forget Romance and Relaxation - This is Maui with the Family

by James Ross

"Why not just sit down?"

I thought it was a reasonable question, but it created quite a stir. The other people taking the lesson with me stopped and stared. I was attempting to master Stand Up Paddle Boarding - a dad trying to keep up with his active children in Maui - but no sooner had I uttered my inane remark then my board slid forward from under me. I landed hard on my back with an exhalation of air, and then slowly rolled into the ocean. My sympathetic family cheered me on. I pulled myself from the water, raised my body unsteadily, smiled meekly at the instructor, and then fell forward toward the bow of the board, tumbling once more into the salty surf, with my mouth half open in a subdued screech. I surfaced sputtering and coughing. read more »


ROMANCE AND FOODIE FUN IN VICTORIA
by Jane Cassie

Succulent beef, doused with a demi glaze. Curry-infused chicken coupled with Jasmine rice. Mushroom ravioli, topped with tomato-parmesan. My husband and I salivate over the amazing spread. "Gotta love this ferry food," Brent says, when he also loads up at the salad bar. read more »


April 2014
THE GULF ISLANDS: AN ARCHIPELAGO SURROUNDED BY WATER
by Hans Tammemagi

As the Queen of Nanaimo chugged into Georgia Strait, the sun sparkled on the waves, fishing boats trolled the waters, a powerful tug pulled a barge on a long line and sailboats floated like butterflies. read more »


RIVETING RELICS AND RUINS BY THE SEA OF GALILEE
by Irene Butler

It's more than the room's cool temperature that sends chills down my spine. The hull of the "Ancient Galilee Boat" my husband Rick and I are gazing upon was the type of boat used by fishermen and for ferrying people and goods on the Sea of Galilee during the time Jesus preached along these shores, which earned it the appellation "Jesus boat". read more »


ESCAPE TO THE TOWNSHIPS
by Karoline Cullen

I chant, "I'm in Canada. Now I'm in the States." as I step back and forth over the line. Then with one foot on either side, I declare I'm in both. At the Haskell Free Library and Opera House, which was deliberately built over the international boundary in the early 1900s, I can simultaneously stand in Stanstead, Quebec and Derby Line, Vermont. The building's front door and audience seats are in the U.S. while the circulation desk, books and stage are in Canada. read more »


TROLLING NORWAY
by Margaret Deefholts

It is a moment of high drama, and squeezed shoulder to shoulder on the deck the crowd, their cameras clicking furiously, know it. On the port side of the ship is a rubber life raft with a crew wearing orange jackets. Although they wave to us reassuringly, they are an emergency team, poised to take action if needed. read more »


March 2014
DEEP IN THE CANYON
HIKE INTO HAVASUPAI FOR AN OASIS ON THE DESERT FLOOR

by Lauren Kramer

You have to hike 10 long, hot, dusty miles to reach Havasu Creek, but when you finally reach this oasis of fast flowing water on the valley floor of the Grand Canyon you will be astonished by its brilliant, blue hue. You'll wrench your backpack off your tired shoulders and wade into the cool water, gratefully allowing the soft current to wash the desert sand from your skin... read more »


ALONG THE TRACKS OF TIME
by Chris McBeath

Within minutes, the station master calls "All Aboard" and the wood burning British Vulcan engine hisses steam into the morning sunshine, and heralds our departure. Slowly we begin to move, rumbling over the tracks out of the Tanjung Aru Station in Kota Kinabalu towards the steamy Borneo countryside... read more »


IRELAND'S ANCIENT BURIAL MOUNDS
by Irene Butler

We drive from Dublin to the archeological landscape of Brú na Bóinne, with its three major tombs - Newgrange, Knowth and Dowth (with smaller satellite tombs around). At the Visitor's Centre we are swept up in the intrigue of these Neolithic places of ritual, called Passage Tombs, for their long entries into the burial chamber. Cairns were built above each tomb and the mounds encased in kerbstones; many of these gigantic stones bearing chiseled markings. Following the Neolithics (3000 - 2000 BC), the tombs continued to be used in succession by Iron Age civilizations, early Christians, and Normans... read more »


HOME ON THE RANGE - RIDING LA REATA RANCH
by James Ross

I hear the distant thunder of galloping horses. What a beautiful sound. George Gaber, owner and operator of La Reata Ranch, had disappeared on his ATV over the steep hill that backdrops the cookhouse, off to round-up the herd of 24 quarter horses that roam freely over the ranch's 5,000 acres. Guests who had gathered at the corral with their hats, chaps and saddle bags, were chattering excitedly in anticipation of the day's ride ahead. Then all went silent as we hear the beating of hooves and see a rising cloud of dust. The herd comes into view, winding its way down a hillside trail and into the corral in a practiced routine. Some whinny joyfully, shaking their heads and kicking up their hind feet playfully... read more »


HOUSEBOATING ON THE SHUSWAP
by Margaret Deefholts

As I stand on the deck of the "Prairie Princess", a Waterways company luxury houseboat docked in Sicamous, on this mid April day, Mara Lake is a swath of deep blue waters stippled with sunlight. We are about to cast off on a three day cruise along one of British Columbia's most scenic getaways in the heart of the Shuswap... read more »


February 2014
ROMANCING AT ROWENA'S
by Jane Cassie

When Valentine's Day rolls around, my husband pulls out all the stops. Candlelight dinners, long stemmed roses, heart-shaped chocolate boxes -and always accompanied by a sentimental schmaltzy card. Although my romancing return usually pales in comparison to his, it sure won't this year. Rolled up and tied with a bow is a scrolled certificate for an overnighter to our favourite haven in Harrison Mills. It's a getaway gift that would impress Cupid -and without a doubt, will be one that raises our passion-meter a notch or two... read more »


THE SPIRITUAL SOUL OF INDIA: VARANASI
by Margaret Deefholts

In the pre-dawn chill of February we walk along the banks of the river Ganges. The eastern sky, swathed in a chiffon-like mist, is pale mauve, but the waters below our boat are dark and mysterious. The morning air smells of wood smoke, cow dung, spices and marigold flowers. Just beyond the ghat steps, a blind beggar sings plaintively... read more »


ROMANTIC JOURNEY DOWN MEMORY LANE
Twenty-Five Years Young

by John Harris

Having been married for twenty-five years my wife Katherine and I decided to take advantage of beautiful October weather and revisit places that have been a significant part of our lives together... read more »


THREE DAYS IN WASHINGTON D.C.
by Karoline Cullen

Welcome to Washington, D.C. My husband Gary and I are here for three days of museums, monuments and memorials. Many are on the Mall, a two mile long, garden-like, National Park with the Washington Monument in the middle. From there to the West lie the monuments and memorials; to the East, the museums of the Smithsonian Institution and the Capitol Building.... read more »


January 2014
ARIZONA ROCKS!
by Margaret Deefholts

As I stand on the rim of a gigantic circular hollow gouged into the barren earth, a desert wind ruffles my hair and whispers secrets of an event which happened 50,000 years ago to create what lies far, far below my viewing platform: the largest meteor crater on Planet Earth. It is nearly a mile across, 550 feet deep and large enough at its base to encompass twenty football fields while two million spectators would fit comfortably along its sloping walls... read more »


ONBOARD, BUT BACKSTAGE: CRUISING, BEHIND THE SCENES
by Lauren Kramer

Anyone who has cruised in recent years will tell you the same thing: a cruise ship is a floating luxury resort of behemoth proportions, with every onboard amenity you could possibly desire. But it's not until you take a behind-the-scenes tour of a cruise ship that you can begin to understand and truly respect the operations that make this gigantic hotel-at-sea work seamlessly... read more »


TRUE BLUE SNOWBIRDS
by Jane Cassie

When my husband, Brent, asks if I want to go on another RV vacation, I give him two thumbs up -wilderness campgrounds, untarnished landscapes, peace and solitude. Being a back-to-nature-kinda-gal, he has my approval!

"I was thinking about something more civilized," he responds. "How 'bout we try the snowbird thing?"

I'd heard that Mesa and Palm Springs were magnets for these golden rovers but I'm not quite ready for senior summer camp... read more »


DIVING INTO THE DEPTHS OF SOUTH AFRICA
by Colleen Friesen

I looked into Richard's dark eyes. They were as clear and bright as an icy Coke. I heard myself say the words before I knew what I was going to say. "I love you Richard. Do you love me?" Poor Richard. Who knew what sort of confessions he'd heard at the edge of this ancient cliff... read more »


December 2013
BIG WHITE CATERS TO BIG FAMILIES
by Jane Cassie

"Are we there yet?" This commonly-heard kid quip pops into my mind, a memory from days gone by when we travelled with our five children via minivan. Was that really two decades ago? Although I love the empty nest thing, I'm hoping that, one day, I'll hear those inquisitive words again -from a few grandkids. Who knows when that'll happen-our next generation seems to be super slow in coming! read more »


HUMPBACKS IN OUR CHRISTMAS STOCKINGS
by Irene Butler

What would be a perfect ending to our week of surf, sand and sun with eighteen family members in Puerto Vallarta? The "eighteen" is no exaggeration - my husband Rick and I rounded up our five sons and their families for a Mexican Christmas. With ages ranging from our youngest grandchild at 7 to "me" at 68, we puzzle over a grand finale to suit all. read more »


CELEBRATING ICEWINE - ONE VERY COOL FESTIVAL
by James Ross

The snow and chilly temperatures set a perfect winter scene in beautiful Niagara-on-the Lake, as my wife and I bundle ourselves in parkas, mitts and wool hats. We set off from our Bed and Breakfast towards Queen Street, wandering past snow-draped vineyards, the region's famous grapes seemingly asleep under a white shroud. We trek into the town's historic downtown. Our plan is to sample the best offerings from the region's 28 wineries, to enjoy the wine, food and live entertainment and to learn more about Niagara's liquid gold. read more »


GOING LOCAL - THE INSIDER'S SCOOP ON PUERTO ESCONDIDO
by Colleen Friesen

Wouldn't it be great to travel like a local?

Even on a supposedly stressless beach holiday, some serious decisions are required. On a recent trip to the tropical town of Puerto Escondido, my husband Kevin and I struggled with some big questions. read more »


November 2013
ANTWERP: BELGIUM
Sweetly and Colorfully Historic

by Rick Millikan

A major historic seaport, Antwerp today ranks Europe's second busiest. Surprisingly after centuries of wars, Belgium's Antwerp retains its rich and fascinating heritage, a bonus for history buffs like us. read more »


SKIING EAST:
Find Some New England Charm Skiing New Hampshire's White Mountains

by Jamie Ross

"Let's ski the Whites," my friend says every year when a family March break trip is being discussed. After finally agreeing to his suggestion, I was forced to admit that I didn't even know where "The Whites" were - I had assumed they were big and white and in British Columbia. (New England … really?) In retrospect, I'm not surprised by my friend's choice, he still likes to call things "groovy," talks about shredding corn dogs (groomed runs), and loves those circa 70's juicy fruit commercials-so his desire to want to ski in a funky, frozen-in-time New Hampshire valley is easily explained. read more »


PUT YOUR BOOTS ON IN TUCSON
Story by Karoline Cullen, Photography by Cullen Photos

"Do you have a comb?" Patrick asks as he shows me the cactus cluster stabbing his finger. "It's the best way to pull the spines out. Better yet, don't get too close to a jumping cholla!" read more »


DINE OUT VANCOUVER FESTIVAL
A Total Palate Pleaser

By Jane Cassie

I confess. I'm a foodie. And it's no secret that Metro Vancouver is a globally-acclaimed cuisine machine. So, every January, when Dine Out Vancouver Festival comes to town, you can count me in-along with my husband. He's a big fan of this palate pleaser too! read more »


October 2013
CRUISING THE AMAZON ON THE CHEAP
By Chris McBeath

Chickens and bananas are also on board, so "cruise" might be a misnomer for this meander up an Amazon tributary in northern Peru, but for adventurers, it doesn't get much better - or cheaper. read more »


AN OASIS OF LUXURY IN THE ARABIAN DESERT
By Hans Tammemagi

A week immersed in super-sized Dubai city-the world's tallest building, an indoor ski hill (in simmering desert heat!), artificial islands, a seven-star hotel-was exhilarating, but also exhausting. Needing to recover, I headed along a modern highway into an empty expanse of beige sand dunes. Then a narrow sand-blown road led deep into the Dubai Desert Conservation Reserve. Finally a clump of trees with tents scattered among them like a Bedouin encampment appeared like a mirage. I had arrived at the Al Maha Resort & Spa deep in the Arabian desert. read more »


GHOSTS THAT DWELL ON THE GULF ISLANDS
By Cherie Thiessen

October is a haunted month. Gulf Islanders know that ghosts are drawn to their shores, so when the nights close in and the fogs and mists and drizzle wrap themselves around the coast, you'll find most islanders indoors after dusk. read more »


"SIMLA" THEN AND "SHIMLA" NOW:
Revisiting the British Raj's Himalayan Summer Capital

By Margaret Deefholts

The driver of our car swings around a series of dizzying hairpin bends. Off the edge of the road are valleys that lie hundreds of feet below us, their toy-sized village houses clinging to the slopes, their pathways threading along the folds of the hills. And rearing against the horizon are the mighty Himalayas-range upon range of gigantic snow covered peaks-one of the most magnificent panoramas in the world. read more »


STARDOM ON SALT SPRING
By Jane Cassie

My stories have always unfolded in privacy-plunked on my duff in front of a computer, and usually sporting my red housecoat (a.k.a. Santa suit to family members). So when the TV show, Senior Living On Location, asks if they can film a few segments of this Salt Spring women's retreat, I think about the uncertain variables-facing that omnipresent lens, camouflaging those ten extra camera-loving pounds, having enough time to include all the things that there are to do. Yet surprisingly, once poised and wired for sound, my two gal pals and I take on the challenge and leap into the spotlight. read more »



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